OUR NEW UNIT – PROBLEMS AT HOME, PROBLEMS ABROAD

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Assignment March 11/12 – Your 20s Social Luminary!

The 1920s was known for great personalities – and you will be one of them at a social gathering at a local speakeasy on Friday.  To prepare for the event, your task is to develop a  FIRST PERSON BIOGRAPHY (two to three well written and complete paragraphs) that discusses your achievements IN THE 20S  AND why you are such an important figure from the 1920s.  You must include a PRIMARY SOURCE QUOTE in your biography, and use it to tell part of your impact as a “luminary” in the 20s. You should also bring in a PICTURE of yourself AND one ARTIFACT (real, fake, printed, etc., but NOT your photo) that tells something about yourself and your impact on society during the decade. You must also include a SAYING or PHRASE (real or made up) that summarizes your importance. You must also post your IMAGE and SAYING or PHRASE on your speakeasy ONLINE BOARD by Friday.

Check out my example to help – I’m Calvin Coolidge, and here are my artifacts.  Notice that my content RESOURCES are CITED … (and you can use one or two resources – that’s enough.  I would go with ABC-CLIO, History, or a quick search for a bio. Focus on the 20s!)

ONLINE SPEAKEASY BOARDS

Speakeasy 1 / Speakeasy 2 / Speakeasy 3

Use the links online to help you find more information about your individual.  Remember – discuss your IMPACT and how you represent one of the themes of the 1920s!  You can also spice up your discussions on Friday with some neato 20s lingo.  Don’t forget to learn the secret knock to enter!

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In class March 11/12 – The Best of Times or the Worst of Times?

How about those 20’s themes?  Starting to get the hang of them?  Let’s dig a little deeper and focus on the essential questions for the 1920s.   You an your partners have a collection of topics from the 1920s.  Your task is to summarize the basics of the topic in regards to the essential questions, identify the THEME from the 1920s, and place the completed topic on the white board under the proper classification – “Best of Times” or “Worst of Times”.  Remember the themes – Business Boom (BB) / Consumer Society (CS) /  Entertainment & Leisure (ME) / Social Change (SC) / Conservative Politics (CP) / Cultural Conflict (CC)

After you the timer runs out, you should examine everyone’s handiwork and construct a thesis for the essential question with a KEY IDEA.  Your thesis does NOT have to cover everything – instead, make a pointed comment about the decade as a whole with an original thesis and some supporting details.

FINALLY – Make sure you check out the link provided once your submit your thesis and details … if you want to have some fun tomorrow.

 

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Hello Roaring 20s!

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times … a famous opening of a Charles Dickens novel? (yes)  A description of the Schwieters / Taft relationshsip? (no … only the best there)  A framework for a way to look at the decade of the 1920s?  Absolutely!

To begin, note the major themes of the 1920s using the voicethread below and the note sheet handed out in class.

Then, your assignment is to get more acquainted with the 1920s.  For an overview of the decade, use the guide on the reverse of your 20s intro and watch America in the 20th Century – The Roaring 20s (usmstudent, wildcats).   You can try to classify each of the topics with one of the themes of the decade.  There is no need to need to take any detailed notes … but this will help you out a lot in class tomorrow!

If you interested (and want some laughs), you can also watch our AHR! friend John Green as he discusses the great decade in The Roaring 20’s: Crash Course US History #32.

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Imperialism and WWI Test review – Round 2 – 7:15 Monday

Make sure you have prepared ahead of time with the review guide – and use your notes and online resources!

Use this link for the online chat to ask questions - and to answer each other’s questions!

 

Don’t forget that your notebooks are due as well.  Here’s the evaluation – it must be self assessed, and make a title page!

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Imperialism and WWI Review – Sunday at 7:00 PM

Make sure you have prepared ahead of time with the review guide – and use your notes and online resources!

Use this link for the online chat to ask questions - and to answer each other’s questions!

Don’t forget that your notebooks are due as well.  Here’s the evaluation – it must be self assessed, and make a title page!

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If you missed the discussion of Peace after WWI …

End of WWI 2015 notes

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TEST REVIEW – Click the doughboy

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Wilson’s War Message – according to you!

Wilson’s War Message – 4/2/17 – Section 1

Wilson’s War Message 4-2-17 Section 2

Wilson’s War Message 4-2-17 Section 3

Wilson’s War Message 4-2-17 Section 4

Wilson’s War Message 4-2-17 Section 5

 

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Assignment February 27 / March 2 – Peace?

How were those trenches?  What did the AEF do “Over There”? Make sure you check out the  impact of the AEF, as one test question will come from this reading!

Once the war ended, what happened?  An easy peace treaty meeting in Paris – typical, right?   Not so fast …

For your next class, preview the peace process that came after the war by reading from ABC-CLIO (usmstudent, historyrules) entitled “The Processes of Peace: Introduction: Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points“ concerning the Paris Peace Conference and the Treaty of Versailles. The History Channel also has a decent overview video and reading.  You can also watch Peace, Diplomacy, and Reparation.  As you read and watch, you should be able to :

  • … generally describe Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points.
  • … discuss why the rest of the “Big Four” opposed Wilson’s Fourteen Points.
  • … give a broad outline of the actual peace provisions of the Treaty of Versailles.
  • … discuss why the Treaty of Versailles was opposed by the Senate and some of the public in the US.
  • … describe how the Versailles process was a failure in the goal of continuous world peace.

Please come to class with some questions about the peace process, as we will discuss it in detail.

You can also spend some time thinking about the legacy of the Great War – The War to End All Wars – World War I.

Check out War Without End,  What Did We Learn?‎ and WWI Casualty and Death Tables from PBS to THINK about the overall impact of the Great War, both globally and in the United States.  Also,  check out the website for the World War I Memorial and sign the petition to rededicate it – we may see it in DC.  You may also want to check out the description of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery – four or you will lay a wreath there in six weeks.

 

 

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