ASSESSMENT – Editorializing Imperialism

Should the United States have been an imperial nation?

Draw your response!

Overall target – I can evaluate American imperialism from multiple perspectives.

I can create an original and effective editorial cartoon using cartooning techniques.

For your EDITORIAL CARTOON, you will draw a SINGLE CARTOON either supporting or opposing imperialism.  Your opinion should be the opposite (pro/con )of the one you present in your editorial.

  • Make sure you have an ISSUE as the subject of your cartoon.  you can draw your cartoon about imperialism in general or a single specific event involving American imperialism.
  • Think of some of the TECHNIQUES you saw in the recent cartoons in class  – symbolism, analogy, stereotype, exaggeration, caricature, references, sarcasm – but you can’t use them all
  • Have a clear and insightful comment (or thesis) – but not one that is too obvious
  • Pay attention to neatness and detail, and make it more than just a series of scratches on a piece of paper
  • Draw it on a full sheet of unlined printer paper, hand it in WITH YOUR NAME ON THE BACK, and take a picture of it so it can be shared online

HINT – The easiest way to create a cartoon is to think of your comment (thesis) first, then apply one or two of the techniques.  

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American Imperialism – GET READY TO ARGUE! February 20/21

SHOULD THE UNITED STATES HAVE BEEN AN IMPERIAL NATION? 

I can discuss the the positives and negatives of American imperialism at the turn of the century.

I can successfully and effectively prepare for and participate in an academic discussion.

In our next class, we will examine American imperialism in more detail as we have a fun little discussion about the United States “spreading its wings” at the turn of the 20th century.

 The class will be divided into two groups, with one side defending the affirmative to the question and one side defending the negative.  Each individual will be responsible for a general understanding of the Age of Imperialism through the preview video.  In addition, each individual will become an expert on one area or example of American imperialism.  You will be responsible for developing a DEBATE PREPARATION SHEET in which you create a statement of facts, identify what aspects and details of your argument you will use in the debate, identify possible ways in which the opposing side will challenge you and how you will respond, and identify specific questions that you will ask the opposing side to strengthen your argument. Your DEBATE PREPARATION SHEET must be completed by the beginning of the debate – and you will be evaluated on your preparation, as well as your participation in the debate. 

As you prepare, think about the list we created at the beginning of class about American involvement in foreign affairs.  Consult the online sources available below  in order to be prepared.  Look for statistics, primary source quotes, and detailed events that can strengthen the impact of your arguments!’

SOME SOURCES (you can use any others – just make sure you site any stats or statements)

General sources on American Imperialism – The Age of Imperialism / The United States Becomes a World Power

Hawaii – The Annexation of Hawaii from Digital History,  Americans overthrow Hawaiian monarchy from History, The Annexation of Hawaii from the Library of Congress

The Spanish American War – The Spanish American War from Digital History,  Spanish-American War from History,  Spanish American War from the National Museum of American History

China and the Open Door – Secretary of State John Hay and the Open Door in China, 1899–1900 from the Department of State, The Boxer Rebellion from Small Planet, Open Door Policy for China fromHistory Central, Open Door Policy Cartoon, Boxer Rebellion cartoon

The Philippine Revolution – The Philippines from Digital History, The Philippine American War from the Department of State, Crucible of Empire – Revolt in the Philippines- from PBS Online, Philippine Independence Declared from History,  Crucible of Empire – Aguinaldo captured by U.S. troops“Another ‘Large Draft on our Credulity” cartoon

Panama – “A Man, A Plan, A Canal, Panama” from Digital History, TR and the Panama Canal from American Experience, The Panama Canal from Small Planet, Panama declares independence from History, “Held Up The Wrong Man” – Panama Cartoon

Involvement in Latin America – Policing the Caribbean and Central America from Digital History, Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine, 1904 from the Department of State, U.S. Intervention in Latin America from Small Planet,  Dollar Diplomacy, 1909–1913 from the Department of State

Mexico and Pancho Villa

Roosevelt, Wilson, and the Morality of PowerAmerican President: President Woodrow Wilson: Foreign Affairs , Wilson and Foreign Affairs

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PREVIEW for February 13/14 – Get ready for Imperialism!

I can describe and evaluate the causes, events, and impact of American imperialism.

While the US was pushing for reform at home, the country was also expanding abroad in the era of IMPERIALISM.  Was American imperialism right or wrong?  That’s our essential question!  How will we answer it?

To preview our discussion, you should spend 30 minutes (yup, it’s timed) watching America in the 20th Century: America Becomes a World Power (usmstudent, wildcats).  As you watch, use this viewing guide to consider the reasons why the United States became an expansionist country in the late 1800s, and then consider each example of American imperialism – ESPECIALLY THE SPANISH AMERICAN WAR.  Should the US have been an imperial nation? That’s your goal!

Want more? Check out our friend John Green!

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The Gilded Age – Then and Now!

Now that we have an overview of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, let’s close by finishing your sketchnotes and making connections!

SKETCHNOTES – Draw and BRIEFLY describe the various topics that the characterize the Gilded Age.  Check out my example below!

To help you limit your searching, try using this chapter from Holt’s United States History from Independence to 1914. There are other links that can help you below for specific topics. Some essentail topics include … The growth of industry, big business and corporations, Captains of industry vs. Robber Barons, income inequality, the growth of railroads, labor problems, labor unions, strikes and collective bargaining,  the growth of citiesurban issues and challenges, political machines and political corruptionimmigration, push and pull factors, challenges and contributions of immigrants, restrictions on immigration

CONNECTIONS

Remember what Mark Twain (maybe) said? History doesn’t repeat itself – at best, it sometimes rhymes. That’s the second step as we compare the Gilded Age with today. As we progress this week, use a separate document to make connections between the past and the present.  Number the topic on your sketchnotes and corresponding topic to provide the connection. The links can be both general and specific, but push yourself to make meaningful and pertinent connections.

A non-example – There were cities in the Gilded Age, and there are cities now. (This would be a 1)

A basic example – Gilded Age cities developed mass transit to move people around and to suburbs.  Cities today have mass transit as well, including some from the Gilded Age era. (A 2 … and could get to a 3 with details)

A better example – Transportation in the cities fo the Gilded Age grew with the development of mass transit lines, including street cars, elevated railways, and subways.  Many cities still rely on this mode of transportation today, and others look to improve their mass transit.  For example, Milwaukee recently created  “The Hop” for citizens in the downtown area.  In addition,  Phoenix,  Seattle, Denver, and Los Angeles are improving their rail network as the cities and industry grow. (Perfecting public transportation: 10 U.S. cities with progressive plans) (Now we are talking 3 or 4)

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In class Feb 5-8 – Hexagonal Thinking and the Progressive Movement

Hexagons for Progressive Example

CLICK THE HEXAGONS!

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PREPARATION FOR FEB 5/6 – Here Come the Progressives!

As you have seen from our investigation of the Gilded Age, there was great of progress in the American  economy, industry, urbanization, and immigration during the late 1800s early 1900s. However, progress comes with a price.   Politics were controlled by the wealthy, and political machines were challenging they ideals of democracy in many of the cities. The income gap between the wealthy and the rest of the nation was enormous.  The environment was ignored for industrial growth, and pollution and destruction of resources became problematic. Cities were overcrowded, and tenement living was unhealthy at best, deadly at worst. People didn’t know what was going into their medicine or food. Monopolies were formed with large corporations controlling many of the major industries of the time, and workers’ worries were ignored or opposed by business and government.  Women were second class citizens, lacing political, economic, and social equality.  African Americans continued to face challenges in all parts of the country.

Who will respond to these problems?

THE PROGRESSIVES

The Progressive Movement emerged in the late 1800s and early 1900s to push for reforms in response to the excesses of the Gilded Age.  We will examine what they did in their attempts to make America a better place on Monday – but you will definitely want to get some background.  So, spend about 27 minutes and 48 seconds this weekend meeting the Progressives (before you watch the Super Bowl). How?  Here you go …

WATCH America in the 20th Century – The Progressive Era.  Use usmstudent, wildcats as your username and password. What should you be looking for?  A general idea of what the Progressive Movement was, an understanding of some of the reforms Progressives pushed for, and some info on the Progressive Presidents (including the big guy – I mean the REALLY big guy). You can (and should) use the Progressive Era Intro as a guide – but no writing is necessary.

You can also watch my buddy John and his Crash Course on the Progressives … but make sure you watch the above video first!

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Learning Experience – Analyzing the Industrialists

Though a century has passed since the heyday of the great industrialists and financiers of the Gilded Age, the debate continues: were these men captains of industry, without whom this country could not have taken its place as a great industrial power, or were they robber barons, limiting healthy competition and robbing from the poor to benefit the rich? Where do we draw the line between unfair business practices and competition that leads to innovation, investment, and improvement in the standard of living for everyone? Would the industrial economy have succeeded without entrepreneurs willing to take competition to its extremes?

It’s your chance to take a stand on this issue and state your case.  Using the four sets of resources (SOURCES – PRIMARY / SECONDARY / TOONS / STATS ) your preparation task is to take some notes on both sides of the historical argument – were the great industrialists Captains of Industry or Robber Barons? Then, develop an opinion and a few convincing and detailed statements to add to an online discussion about this topic.

Of course, you can make connections to the present here to add to your overall sketchnotes and links to today!

LOOKING FOR MORE INFO AND IDEAS? Check out …

The links below come from “The Men Who Built America”, a recent History Channel documentary.  Check out more about your individual!

Want more?  Take a lookyloo at  The Wealthiest Americans Ever – New York Times and The 20 Richest People Of All Time

Even more?

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In-class Creation – Sketching the Gilded Age!

The Gilded Age was an era of America’s story often overlooked in history classes – but essential to understanding our world today. The incredible growth and change in the United States set the stage for modern America to emerge at the turn of the 19th century, and for a complete transformation of American society. What does that mean for us in 2019?  Some feel we are in a second Gilded Age – more agree with that opinion – actually, even more! Wait – another one?  And, is it everywhere?

So … what does this mean for us? Why does this era matter?

To begin our quick examination of the Gilded Age, your task is to visually represent many of the content and themes of the era by creating some sketchnotes or collage. Using the materials available here and the videos from your preview work, draw and BRIEFLY describe the various topics that the characterize the Gilded Age.  Check out my example below!

To help you limit your searching, try using this chapter from Holt’s United States History from Independence to 1914. There are other links that can help you below for specific topics. You do NOT have to read every word … instead get a decent overview of the various topics-ok?

Some key topics: The growth of industry, big business and corporations, Captains of industry vs. Robber Barons, income inequality, the growth of railroads, labor problems, labor unions, strikes and collective bargaininggrowth of cities, urban issues and challenges, political machines and political corruption, immigration, push and pull factors, challenges and contributions of immigrants, restrictions on immigration


Remember what Mark Twain (maybe) said? History doesn’t repeat itself – at best, it sometimes rhymes. That’s the second step as we compare the Gilded Age with today. As we progress this week, use a separate document to make connections between the past and the present.  Number the topic on your sketchnotes and corresponding topic to provide the connection. The links can be both general and specific, but push yourself to make meaningful and pertinent connections.

A non-example – There were cities in the Gilded Age, and there are cities now. (This would be a 1)

A basic example – Gilded Age cities developed mass transit to move people around and to suburbs.  Cities today have mass transit as well, including some from the Gilded Age era. (A 2 … and could get to a 3 with details)

A better example – Transportation in the cities fo the Gilded Age grew with the development of mass transit lines, including street cars, elevated railways, and subways.  Many cities still rely on this mode of transportation today, and others look to improve their mass transit.  For example, Milwaukee recently created  “The Hop” for citizens in the downtown area.  In addition,  Phoenix,  Seattle, Denver, and Los Angeles are improving their rail network as the cities and industry grow. (Perfecting public transportation: 10 U.S. cities with progressive plans) (Now we are talking 3 or 4)

Paper platforms are available in class, but if you want to use your own paper, feel free!

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Preview Experience – An Intro to the Gilded Age

Hey young historians!  We are moving from the Wild West to the cities of the Northeast and we dive into the Gilded Age!  To prepare for class on Monday/Tuesday, take a look at the materials below and be able to give a decent description of “THE GILDED AGE” as you enter class.

Check out “The Gilded Age Overview” from Digital History.

Check out “The Gilded Age” from USHistory.org.

If you love Crash Course – you can spend some time on these as well:

 

 

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THE WEST – The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

Ready to dig into the Wild West?  What better way than to watch some movies?  Grab some popcorn, a soda, and a comfy chair and check out these short clips from America A Story of Us. You can start to start grabbing some notes about the post Civil War era of the West and record the on your handout.  Spend as as much time as you desire over the long weekend – especially if you are jammed up with NHD!

America, The Story of US – The Transcontinental Railroad

America, The Story of US – Homestead Act

America, The Story of Us – The Cowboy and Cattle Drives

The History Channel – The Buffalo

America, The Story of US – Destroying the Buffalo Herds

America, The Story of Us – Plains Indians Wars

History Channel has some good (and short) videos, including The American Buffalo and The Last of the Sioux

Of course, you could also watch the actual classic – The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. I think it’s on Hulu!

 

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